DCRI Newsletters

DCRI Newsletters

DCRI newsletters highlight areas in which our faculty and clinical operations experts are engaging in cutting-edge research. Learn how we are helping to advance pragmatic clinical trials, leverage electronic health records, open data to researchers worldwide, drive mobile health and usher in an new era of precision medicine.

2016 NEWSLETTER HIGHLIGHTS

Fall 2016 Newsletter

INNOVATION STATION
Researchers at the DCRI have received a major federal grant to study how clinical trials of new drugs can be conducted more efficiently.

EARLY WARNING
Duke University could receive up to $19 million to lead early-stage clinical trials for new drugs to treat neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease and neuropathy.

A BREATH OF FRESH AIR
The DCRI has announced the expansion of the IPF-PRO Registry, a patient registry developed to uncover insights into a rare and serious lung disease

KID STUFF
The DCRI has been named the coordinating center as part of a $157-million federal initiative involved in studying how environmental factors affect childhood health.

 

Summer 2016 Newsletter

DATA DETECTIVES
DCRI researchers recently examined how researchers are actually using open-access clinical trial data platforms.

OPEN BOOK
A new collaboration will give more researchers access to the largest and oldest cardiovascular database in the world.

GROWING EPIDEMIC
The alarming increase in U.S. childhood obesity rates that began nearly 30 years ago continues unabated, with the biggest increases in severe obesity, according to a study led by a DCRI researcher.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
A new study conducted by DCRI researchers suggests that patients who need to have their thyroid gland removed should seek surgeons who perform 25 or more thyroidectomies a year for the least risk of complications.

 

Spring 2016 Newsletter

WALK HARD
The DCRI’s Janet Bettger, ScD, is leading a global study to gather data on people's physical activity.

TO SCREEN OR NOT TO SCREEN
A study by Duke researchers shows that the benefits and risks of mammographic screening for women remain unclear.

BUG HUNT
New cleaning methods can cut transmission rates of deadly "superbugs" in hospital rooms, according to DCRI and Duke researchers.

REGISTRY RESULTS
The initial results of the Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis – PROspective Outcomes (IPF-PRO) Registry have been released.

MODEL BEHAVIOR
Scientists at the DCRI and Duke Medicine are using transparent fish to watch in real time as Cryptococcal meningitis takes over the brain.

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2013 Archives